Investigation of virus diseases of brassica crops.
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Investigation of virus diseases of brassica crops.

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Published by University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Vegetables -- Diseases and pests,
  • Viruses

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 85-87.

The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 94 p. illus., maps, plates.
Number of Pages94
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14789838M

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Virus diseases caused severe losses in brassica crops in England in the years just after World War II, and the Agricultural Research Council asked Dr. Broadbent, of Rothamsted, to undertake a thorough study of the problem. This was done in cooperation with Advisory Officers of the N.A.A.S. and a number of growers. The result is a report bulging with detailed data-the product Cited by: This book provides insights into the latest achievements in genomics research on Brassica rapa. It describes the findings on this Brassica species, the first of the U’s triangle that has been sequenced and a close relative to the model plant Arabidopsis, which provide a basis for investigations of major Brassica crop species.   Investigation of Virus Diseases of Brassica Crops Originally published in , as number 14 in the Agricultural Research Council Report Series, this book was created in response to serious losses in brassica crop production caused by viral : TuMV was ranked second only to Cucumber mosaic virus as the most important virus infecting field-grown vegetables in a survey of virus diseases .

  Abstract. Virus and viroid diseases are serious constraints to the production and profitability of a wide range of tropical crops. Many plant virus outbreaks have been recorded in the last two decades around the world and the ultimate aim of the applied plant virologist is to devise measures for combating the virus and viroid by:   Investigation of Virus Diseases of Brassica Crops Originally published in , as number 14 in the Agricultural Research Council Report Series, this book was created in response to serious losses in brassica crop production caused by viral : Ayo Bamgbose. Book Sets & Collections. Signed Books. Association Copies. General Signed Books. Investigation of Virus Diseases of Brassica Crops. Broadbent, L. Host Index of Virus Diseases of Plants / Index of the Vectors of Virus Diseases of Plants. Cook, M.T. Restricting Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) spread in canola (Brassica napus) crops often relies upon the application of systemic insecticides to protect young vulnerable plants from wide-scale green-peach aphid (GPA; Myzus persicae) colonization and subsequent virus infection. For these to be applied at the optimal time to ensure they prevent.

In book: Diseases of Field and Horticultural Crops, Chapter: Diseases of Rapeseed-Mustard, Publisher: Regency Publications, New Delhi, Editors: P. Chowdappa, pp oilseed Brassica crops.   Abstract. Brassica rapa is a crop species of economic importance. It is cultivated worldwide as oil and vegetable crops. It belongs to the genus Brassica, tribe Brassiceae of the family genus Brassica includes many important crops. Among them, relationship of six species formed the model of U’s triangle, with three basic diploid species B. Cited by: 2. Brassica oleracea L. belongs to the Brassicaceae family (previously called the Cruciferae) (Figure ).Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts are well known vegetables of the Brassica genus, which also includes mustards and the oil-seed plants canola (B. napus L. and Brassica rapa L). The word brassica, meaning to cut off the head, is probably derived from . Soilborne diseases are persistent problems in potato production, resulting in reductions in tuber quality and yield. Brassica rotation crops may reduce soilborne potato diseases, but how to best utilize Brassica crops in potato cropping systems has not been established. In this research, two two-year trials were established at three different sites with histories of soilborne diseases, Cited by: 1.